Kalamera Wine Cooler

Kalamera wine coolers are well know and from a very good quality. We will do as many Kalamera wine cooler reviews to provide you with the best choices to keep your wine at the perfect temperature and humidity.
While these wine refrigerators have been around for some time, modern technology has made it just that much better. The Kalamera Wine refrigerator has been creating quite a buzz in this field and as wine refrigerators are a costly investment, I will do Kalamera wine cooler reviews in a detailed manner so that you can have a clear picture about the pros and the cons of this Kalamera appliance before you go spending your money on it.

Kalamera 24 inch wine refrigerator review

Kalamera 24 inch and 46 bottle wine refrigerator review
This Kalamera wine fridge holds 48 bottles.

Main Features

  • 22.4 x 23.4 x 33 inches
  • stainless steel
  • Built-
  • 110 volt – 90 watts
  • Door Hinges Reversible
  • Upper zone: 40-50°F, lower zone: 50-66°F

Our opinion about the Kalamera 24″ wine fridge

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A quick look at the opinions of the people who have used it reveals that the common consensus is that it is one of the most versatile appliances of its type. The easily accessible trays which can be pulled out and different temperature zones which allow the wine to be enjoyed at different temperatures. The LED lighting which can be customized to quite an extent also is a great hit with its users. With an overwhelming 81% of buyers rating it 4 stars or more, this refrigerator is definitely worth considering if you are on the lookout for a wine refrigerator. I will look at all the features in detail now so that you will get an idea of what you will be getting in return for your money.

Stainless steel construction

Another point where this wine refrigerator scores highly is the way in which it has been built. It uses high-grade stainless steel as the main material of construction. It gives the refrigerator a clean look while being corrosion free and being strong enough to be able to take a few bumps without getting any ugly dents or scratches.

5 shelves

The 5 shelves are made from beech wood which gives it the classy look that goes really well with wine bottles while being able to hold the wine bottles very well. They slide out easily making them very accessible. On the other side of the shelf, there are stoppers that prevent the wine bottles from rolling out. The glass in the front is specially made to reflect ultra-violet rays which mean that this refrigerator will be able to cool efficiently even when exposed to direct sunlight which might be the case when it might be used as a display for wines. The door is also reversible and comes equipped with a security lock.

Compressor

Looking at the heart of this refrigerator, its compressor and cooling units I am glad to let you know that it doesn’t just look good but packs quite a punch. The compressor is a heavy duty unit which ensures proper and quick cooling while being very efficient with its energy consumption. It also has additional hardware intended to reduce the vibrations to a minimum. So even if it is installed in a quiet home environment, you won’t have to put up with the annoying whir generally associated with cooling units. It is also quality tested to ensure a long operating life even when used continuously.

Dual temperature zones

A cool feature of this wine refrigerator is the smart digital control it comes equipped with. As I told you earlier, this refrigerator has two zones which can be set to different temperatures. The upper zone can be set to temperatures between 40 and 50-degree Fahrenheit which are perfect for white wines while the lower zone can be set to temperatures between 50 and 60-degree Fahrenheit which are more suited for red wines. All these settings are controlled by the digital controller which is clearly labeled and easy to use and best of all, it remembers these setting even in the case of a power outage and as soon as the power is restored it cools the interiors to the temperatures you had set.

Installation

Coming to the working of the refrigerator, it cools very efficiently once it is in regular use. It does not exactly plug and play and you will have to wait approximately 48 hours. The first 24 hours it has to be allowed to just sit upright and the next 24 hours it has to be plugged in and run empty and then it is ready to accept wine bottles. Once this hurdle is cleared at the start, it works like a charm and keeps the wine chilled and tasting great. There are enough fans on the inside to ensure that every nook and corner is properly ventilated and cooled.

Maintenance

Now I will look at its maintenance. It is quite natural that over time the interiors and the exteriors would need cleaning. This can be easily done on this refrigerator. All you need is a wet cloth and some patience. All you have to do is empty the refrigerator and pull out one shelf at a time and give the whole thing a nice wipe down. Cleaning the exterior is as simple as it is going to get.

Capacity

It does list a 46 bottle capacity. I will make that a bit more clear for you. This capacity is based on a typical Bordeaux bottle. The 5 shelves can each hold 8 bottles while the bottom part of the refrigerator can hold and additional 6 bottles. This capacity is more than sufficient for any home and most restaurants. The LED lighting sweetens the deal and coupled with the beech wood shelves give the refrigerator a look that is the perfect blend between modern and classy.

Energy use

A common concern when buying a large electrical appliance is its energy consumption. I can put these concerns to rest as the Kalamera 24” Wine refrigerator is very energy efficient. The compressor runs only for short duration’s even when it the door is frequently opened without affecting the temperature on the inside. This is achieved by the clever design of the interiors and the strategic placements of the fans which keep the cool air inside the refrigerator. The LED lighting system also consumes very little electricity. Overall it consumes just 90 watts of power. Add to that the excellent customer service and this is one of the best wine refrigerators out there.

Where to buy the Kalamera 24 inch wine cooler

So if you want a quality wine refrigerator that looks cool and classy, cools efficiently, consumes minimum energy and is price reasonable then the Kalamera 24” Wine refrigerator is worth a look as it achieves all of these in style.
We have found a great price on the largest online store and you can go click on the next link to see the price.
Click here to see the price

Kalamera 12 inch wine refrigerator review

Kalamera 12 inch and 18 bottle wine cooler review
This Kalamera wine fridge holds 18 bottles.
Someone mentioned that this is the smaller version of the 24″ but I think you can not compare them although they have some of the same features. The 12 inch Kalamera has one temperature zone compared to the 24″ having two.

Main features

  • 22.4 x 11.6 x 33.9 inches
  • 40-66°F
  • built-in
  • stainless steel
  • 110 volts – 98 Watts
  • Door Hinges reversible

Our opinion about the Kalamera 12 inch – 18 bottle wine cooler

After reading through all the specs and features we fond that this is almost like the 24 inch but than the built in version and smaller.

The shelves have the same functionality and design for easy storage and opening to get a bottle of wine out of it.

We will dig a little deeper later but for now we recommend this as a good buy.

Where to buy the Kalamera 12 inch wine cooler

Click here to see the price

Wine Glasses

Types of wine glassesFinding the best wine glasses for your wine can be taunting. We have made it easy for you to find the wine glass that is made to draw out the finest flavors and aromas of the wine you use.

Wine glasses can range in price from affordable to very expensive depending on the type of glass you prefer.
An affordable stemless wine glass can be bought for as low as a few dollar. A long stem crystal wine glass is probably in a totally different price class. Most wine glasses are made from a combination of Soda lime, Silica and Soda.

We try to show you as many wine glasses in styles and sizes without making it even harder to choose from.

Red wine glasses

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Basically a red wine glass is a bit taller and the bowl is larger. Reason is that red wine is bolder than white wine and this requires a larger glass to allow all the flavors and aromas to come out better.

White wine glasses

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A white wine glass is most of the time a little smaller since white wine is not so bold and rich. This requires a smaller glass so the flavors and aromas stay more confined in the glass.

Large wine glasses

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Crystal wine glasses

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Crystal wine glasses are most of the time not cheap. Reason is that they are made of Silica and Lead oxide and Soda.
You can see a video on how crystal wine glasses are made here.

This article is under constant updates and glasses not available anymore will be replaced with the latest models.

We will also advice on wine glass racks and wine glass storage for if you only use them ones in a while.

Difference between glass stemware and crystal

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Like I briefly mentioned before crystal is made with lead monoxide and it can come in a percentage of 1% to up to 30% in European made glasses. Lead free glassware is most of the time made with Zinc or Magnesium oxide because this will also reflect the light like we see in crystal.
If you look at a regular stemware glass you will notice that it does not sparkle as much. Stem ware glasses are most of the time however sturdier and less breakable than crystal.

If you like or don’t mind to clean and hand-wash your wine glasses you can choose crystal. If you however don’t like that I would suggest to look for regular glass ware since that can be washed in the dishwasher and will not break to easily.

Two basic glasses to start with

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In my opinion for someone who is looking for a basic set of wine glasses the best way to start is with a set of:

  • 6 red wine glasses
  • 6 Champagne flutes

What shape of wine glass to use?

There are tons of publications written about the shape of wine glasses and what shape to use for what type of wine.
Later I will write more about this but the basic is that how fuller bodied the wine is the wider and more round shape a glass should be. You can also remember that a red wine glass is never filled as much as a white wine.

Wine glass set

For someone who get started with drinking wine and trying to find the right glass to use it is easier to buy wine glasses online and start with the following sets we choose as a good buy.

Red wine glasses sets

red wine glass set by Paksh noveltyPaksh novelty makes some highly rated red wine glass sets that are from a restaurant quality. Made in Italy and with its height of 8.5 inches this is a nice all round red wine glass.

Red wine glass set star ratingsCompared to the white wine glass from the same company you can see that the body is more rounded to keep the aroma more in the glass.

The wider size will increase the contact surface between the wine and the air to enhance the flavors.

We found over 260 people who took the time to write about their opinion about this red wine glass set and with an overall rating of 4.7 out of 5 stars this can be considered a very good purchase.

White wine glasses sets

White wine glass set of 4Paksh Novelty white wine glasses. Set of 4 clear glasses in a 15 ounce size.
We have found over 160 people who bought this set and gave it an average of 4.8 out of 5 stars.

This set is made in Italy and the glasses are made of a lead free composition that enables a very clear glass.
customer ratings for white wine glass setAlthough many people recommend not to use a dishwasher for wine glasses these white wine glasses are dishwasher safe.

These glasses are labeled restaurant quality and this means that they are a little sturdier than some other types of wine glasses. In the reviews I read that a lot of people like this feature.

The glasses are 8.5 inches tall the base is 3.5 inches and this makes it very stable.

Champagne flute set

Lenox lead free champagne glassesChampagne flutes can be a good start for wine glasses like we mentioned before. We have found a set of 4 Lenox Tuscany champagne flutes.

They are made from lead free crystal and will hold 7 ounces.
The height is 10.5 inches.
In my opinion a great set affordable quality champagne flutes and very well to use for white wine.

Making Wine At Home in Nebraska

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in New York

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in Maryland

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in Kentucky

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in Pennsylvania

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in Ohio

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in Delaware

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374

Making Wine At Home in Massachusetts

The easiest way to make wine at home is following a good Wine Making Course.

See and click on our recommended wine making course in the side-bar.

wine making classes onlineWine making at home is not complicated and the myths of only producing homemade vinegar are totally unfounded. Stick to these simple rules and you will be able to make consistently high quality wines full of character – that you are proud to serve your friends with.

The term ‘wine making’ implies that the fruit of choice is always grapes, but wine can be made successfully from all sorts of hedgerow fruits from damson to elderberry. Plenty of room to experiment.

The first and foremost tip is to make sure that whatever fruit you are using that it is perfectly clean and disease free. Damaged fruit introduces nasty flavors which are difficult to remove without the use of additives – which we want to avoid.
Secondly, just as important is the use of good quality food grade equipment and utensils. Stainless steel vessels are the best, glass and neoprene are also good. So remember, the better the equipment combined with clean fruit equals easy efficient wine making.
Use the best quality yeasts you can get hold of and don’t forget that the yeast, whether it is a dried cultured one or not, will be responsible for much of the character of the eventual wine. Many people underestimate the value of yeast, I personally like to use a Champagne-based dry culture yeast.
Next it has to be said is ‘attention to detail’. How often do you you hear those words from a winemaker? This starts right from making sure that the fruit are at their optimum ripeness and acidity when picked through to correct sugar adjustment calculations (if you are having to chaptalise, i.e. the addition of sugar to increase alcohol).
This is the best tip, taste regularly. By this I mean while the fermentation is under way taste a sample every few days so you can detect at an early stage if anything odd may be about to happen. This gets harder as the fermentation progresses and there is less and less sugar to be detected, but it wont take long to train your palate to search for off-flavors or problems.
Don’t leave the wine on the lees (sediment) for too long after the fermentation has finished or you may pick up sulphury or bad eggs flavors – that’s why tasting is vital to enable early detection. Prevention is always better than cure.
Post fermentation, treat the wine with care as now is the time it needs protection from both oxygen and bacteria. Commercially this is done by the introduction of sulphur dioxide (SO2) in a gas form or Campden tablets for home wine making. Overdosing with SO2 will mean that the wine will take much longer before it can be drunk, whilst too little will not protect the wine adequately. Clean wines require less SO2 which will result in a much more stable wine. Hygiene is king!
When the wine has settled well or been filtered to a sterile state, take care with the bottling and ensure that new bottles are used along with high grade quality corks. Other closure devices such as screw caps are becoming more popular and are just as good to use, especially if you plan to drink the wine when very young rather than laying it down. Corks allow the wine to breathe, caps don’t – important for wines that are to be aged.

Wine making at home is fun and fulfilling, low cost with no legal alcohol limit and no tax which makes it more than worthwhile to consider.

Cheers and successful wine making!

Wine is a fascinating subject, the more you know, the more you want to find out. Learn how to taste and appreciate wine from a professional, and much more from this beginners guide to Understanding Wine. Also, discover how to pair wines and food successfully.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Hemphill/146970

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/2529374